Teaching

Teaching

The ENCRYPTO Group offers the following courses and theses.

Continuous Courses

ENCRYPTO Oberseminar

Upcoming Lectures, Labs, and Seminars

Digitaltechnik WS19/20 (Integrierte Veranstaltung, in German)
PrivDev WS19/20 (Project/Lab)

Current Lectures, Labs, and Seminars

CRYPROT SS19 (Integrated Course)
PrivDev SS19 (Project/Lab)

Past Lectures, Labs, and Seminars

PrivDev WS18/19 (Project/Lab)
PrivTech WS18/19 (Seminar)
CRYPROT SS18 (Integrated Course)
PrivTech WS17/18 (Seminar)
PrivTech WS16/17 (Seminar)
PrivTech WS15/16 (Seminar)

Open Thesis Topics

Below we give examples for open thesis topics for bachelor and master projects. Students who attended at least one of our courses are very welcome to contact us regarding more unannounced topics or to apply for innovative self-proposed topics that match our research profile.

  • Evaluating Attacks on Encrypted Databases with Real-World Query Data

    Bachelor Thesis, Master Thesis

    The cryptographic community has created a number of structured encryption techniques that allow one or multiple clients to query outsourced encrypted databases (EDBs). These techniques transform the query into a token that the server can then use to compute the corresponding response. The existing schemes vary in functionality and in security, as they result in different kinds of information leakage about the queries. Current efficient schemes usually leak the access pattern (which documents satisfy a token) and the search pattern (whether tokens concern the same query).

    The goal of this thesis is to generate a wide range of individual, simulated query datasets based on public information of individuals. This data is to be used to gain a sense of how real-world queries are distributed across selected domains and to reduce assumptions in the empirical evaluation of EDB attacks. Evaluations of certain attacks should be carried out on varying simulated queries across different domains. go

  • Optimized Circuits for n-Input Gates

    Bachelor Thesis

    Many protocols for secure computation represent the function to be computed as a Boolean circuit consisting of XOR and AND gates. Here, the XOR gates can be computed locally without the use of cryptographic operations, whereas the AND gates require interaction between the parties and are thus expensive. The goal of this thesis is to optimize n-input gates (the gates that map an n-bit input to the corresponding 1-bit output) by replacing them with the minimum number of AND gates and some amount of XOR gates in order to reduce their AND-size. go